voice of the people

2009

Tom: My favorite athlete

by | Jul 17, 2009
Tom: My favorite athlete

Tommy is my favorite athlete of all time. Not Julius Erving, whom I played against for four years in high school, and later had the good fortune to encounter professionally. Not Tom Glavine, the Atlanta Braves Hall of Fame pitcher who is the best athlete, in every sense, I’ve ever dealt with as a sportswriter. No, not Dr. J or Glav. My favorite athlete ever is Tom Wilkinson. Even with an eight-year age difference, we were very close from the start. The three words I heard most often at 14 Farnum Street were “Pitch to me!” When Tommy, the youngest of three kids, was born, our Dad, who worked nights, was understandably less inclined to wake up on three hours sleep and play ball with his little boy. Instead … ”Jackie, pitch to me!” In the driveway. That’s where I pitched to Tommy, sometimes for what seemed like hours. And […]

A visit with Lady Liberty

by | Jul 16, 2009
A visit with Lady Liberty

The news earlier this month of the reopening of the Statue of Liberty, once again letting tourists wiggle their way through the iconic figure on Liberty Island, had me tumbling backward to a memorable trip my family took to New York in the early 1990s. Right here in metro Atlanta, of course, we have our own hotspots – Stone Mountain, the Margaret Mitchell House, CNN, the Big Chicken – but eventually most of us Southerners get a hankering to visit the Big Apple. If you plot out the details before arriving, over a long weekend it’s possible to visit the Central Park Zoo and the Museum of Modern Art; dash through The Plaza Hotel and walk along Fifth Avenue; nosh your way through a foot-high corned beef sandwich at the Carnegie Deli and catch a matinee at the Gershwin Theater in Times Square; hop aboard the subway and stroll through […]

Hellfire, brimstone, and Mountain Dew

by | Jul 16, 2009
Hellfire, brimstone, and Mountain Dew

I remember the cold bottle sweating in my hand and me not daring to drink that last tasty swallow of sin…

A sermon for the choir

by | Jul 16, 2009
A sermon for the choir

Listen up you godless, spineless, irrational, sushi-eating, America-blaming, terrorist-coddling, morally superior, Hollywood-humping, liberal, defeatocrat, progressive, elitist, Marxist, business-bashing, whining, pinko, tree-hugging, vegan-exalting, crackpot, sanctimonious, stem-cell-sucking, tofu-chomping, out-of-touch, pantywaist, tax-hiking, Obamaton snobs*. This is a defining moment. A tipping point. A chance such as we have never had before. A chance that we, the world, will never have again. This is the moment. It will define the future of our children and generations to come. Forever. This is a planet-changing moment. Life and death serious. We have a narrow window and it will close. I fear we are going to blow it. Grab a beer and watch it on TV. Cheat this chance to make our brief moments here matter. I fear, we are going to damn ourselves to an eventual, perhaps, inevitable oblivion and take everyone with us. You know the litany. The talking points. Stop. Think about them. This […]

Tower of Babel

by | Jul 15, 2009
Tower of Babel

I have the uncanny ability to mangle the language of any country I happen to be visiting. This trait is only slightly more pronounced than my ability to mangle English. Late at night on the streets of Paris I was completely lost in a desolate part of the city. A car stopped, a man got out and, hoping to explain my paltry understanding of the language I said: “Je parles Francais,” accidentally leaving out the all important “n’ and pas.” “You speak French!” He exclaimed in beautiful English, intuiting that indeed I did not. Searching through Mexico City for a folk art shop we read about, we discovered it just as the owner was locking the door. “Are you closé?” I said, pronouncing the “e” as an “A” and somehow thinking that might turn it into Spanish. “Yes, we are closed!” the store owner said, not bothering to hide his […]

Our troubles with the North

by | Jul 14, 2009
Our troubles with the North

We had talked on the phone and exchanged e-mails, but I had never met Han Park and wasn’t sure what he looked like. When I arrived at an upscale tea house in Seoul, South Korea, I told the hostess I was there to meet Dr. Park. She dutifully wrote his name on a small, hand-held chalkboard and walked around the room ringing a bell. When she returned, she said, “But, sir, there are so many Dr. Parks here.” I should not have been surprised. Park, like Kim and Lee, is a very common name in Korea. But the Dr. Park I was looking for — and who found me a few minutes later — was a singular man. A professor at the University of Georgia, Park might be the most authoritative expert on North Korea in the United States. For that reason, I took seriously an Associated Press report a […]

Ria: Classic comfort food evoking ‘slowness of the South’

by | Jul 14, 2009
Ria: Classic comfort food evoking 'slowness of the South'

Aurianna Pell, the Atlanta restaurateur known as Ria, made her mark serving breakfast and lunch across from Historic Oakland Cemetery. The success of Ria’s Bluebird over the past eight years has helped shepherd the resurgence of Memorial Drive and the Cabbagetown and Grant Park neighborhoods. Pell, 41, is now working on launching another restaurant, one that will offer suave Southern meals focused on wine, mixed drinks and conversation, in the more upscale Inman Park neighborhood. Pell says Sauced, which, as it name implies, will incorporate plenty of sauces in its “low and slow” cuisine, is scheduled to open in the fall. With the economy extremely weak, she picked a tough time to strike out on a new venture. She’s already felt the sting of failure. Another Pell restaurant, Patio Daddy-O BBQ in East Point, closed because of the winding down of the Fort McPherson Army base. The tattooed entrepreneur took […]

Friendly community welcomes a ‘Savage’

by | Jul 14, 2009
Friendly community welcomes a 'Savage'

Perched at the top of the “V” of the intersection of Laredo and N. Clarendon in Avondale Estates, just east of Atlanta, is the new second location of Savage Pizza. Though the décor of the new restaurant has a modern feel, the familiar comic book character theme from the original Savage Pizza in Atlanta’s Little Five Points prevails. Comic books, a passion of Myron Monsky, one of the partners, have been part of Savage Pizza since it opened in 1990. “The theme resonates with young and not so young children,” says partner Field Coxe, with a wry grin. A large Superman action figure sitting on the counter greets customers as they enter the restaurant and the brightly colored walls are covered with comic paraphernalia. The menu at the family friendly restaurant is the same as the Little Five Points’ location. “We’ve developed a little bit of a brand,” said Coxe, […]

Home Movies: Storm the Barricades or …

by | Jul 14, 2009
Home Movies: Storm the Barricades or ...

Bastille Day!!! Time to storm the barricades. Or rent these movies: START THE REVOLUTION WITHOUT ME (1969) Donald Sutherland and Gene Wilder star as twins literally separated at birth. One pair goes on to become bloodthirsty aristocrats especially skilled at fencing. The other becomes hapless peasants caught up in the French Revolution. The humor is very late ‘60s-silly, but much of it is still riotous today – especially Hugh Griffith as a senile Louis XVI. And yes, that’s Orson Welles, the BIG man himself, as the pompous narrator. A TALE OF TWO CITIES (1935) Classic Golden Age Hollywood with David O. Selznick tackling Charles Dickens before moving on to Margaret Mitchell. Selznick was the producer, not the director, but as was his wont, he ran the show as much as he could. A clean-shaven Ronald Colman stars as the “’tis a far, far better thing” hero, but Blanche Yurka steals […]

A Treatise on Grillin’ – Real men don’t have gas

by | Jul 14, 2009
A Treatise on Grillin’ – Real men don’t have gas

A good friend of mine, Jack (last name withheld to protect the guilty) informed me he has recently bought a gas grill — so I’m writing him to straighten him out. Dear Jack(ass) The art of grilling, for better or worse, is a man’s identity. It’s more important than money, fame or even family. Sell the kids if necessary but hold on to the grill. I mean if you can’t grill a decent pork roast or ribs, what good are you? But over gas!!!??? Hell Damn No! Grilling — real grilling — is not done over gas. You COOK over gas, you GRILL over coals. There’s no compromise on this matter. Working as a male prostitute is more honorable than a man standing in front of an eight-hundred-dollar-chrome-gas-grill from Lowe’s! Gas grilling is uncompromisingly gay. (Please, no insult is intended toward gay men or women who grill over charcoal or […]

The Legacy of Slavery & Health Reform

by | Jul 13, 2009
The Legacy of Slavery & Health Reform

In his last public act, Benjamin Franklin presented to the US Congress a petition on behalf of the Philadelphia Society for the Abolition of Slavery asking for the abolition of slavery and an end to the slave trade. The petition, signed on February 3, 1790, asked the first US Congress, then meeting in New York City, to “devise means for removing the Inconsistency from the Character of the American People,” and “promote mercy and justice toward this distressed Race.” The Senate took no action and the House tabled it, claiming the Constitution restrained them from prohibiting the importation or emancipation of slaves until 1808. Franklin, in a public forum once stated that “Slavery is such an atrocious debasement of human nature, that its very extirpation, if not performed with solicitous care, may sometimes open a source of serious evils.” With the submission of the petition, it is said that Franklin […]

A Man of Grace

by | Jul 13, 2009
A Man of Grace

If the clock is right, it’s 11:17. Paul Hemphill, chronicler of the unsung trucker and the well sung country star ponders a photographer, Louie Favorite, whose face is partly covered by a Leica. The image he captures resonates of a man at ease, comfortable with and surrounded by his life. The photograph of Jimmy Carter above his desk, an unpretentious bookshelf filled with books of literature and art and a comfortable sofa to ponder it all. Awards hang in the corner, an after thought. A love of the game lines the top of the shelves, a reminder of the start of this writer’s life as a sports writer. Favorite photos, notes and mementos glow in the soft light of a lamp and a drawing of the Bard stands watch, a reminder of the history of his craft. In a sixtieth of a second Louie captured a slice of life and […]

How to run unopposed — and lose

by | Jul 13, 2009
How to run unopposed — and lose

Genuine two-party politics takes some getting used to around Georgia. For most of our lives, winning the Democratic primary was “tantamount to election,” as all the papers used to say. No more, however. The more things change, the more they stay the same is what some might say, though. In many communities across Georgia, winning the Republican primary — with no Democratic opposition — can now allow candidates to coast to what is likely an easy victory in November. Notice I say … “likely.” It’s not a certainty. Even though many candidates had no opposition in their primary elections, they still don’t get officially “elected” until they get at least one vote in the general election — to make it official. That’s not always as simple as it sounds. I remember well a race for county commission chairman in our small town of Blackshear, Georgia back in the mid-1970s. That […]

Let Us Speak of Gumbo

by | Jul 12, 2009
Let Us Speak of Gumbo

Let us speak of gumbo.

That’s the inscription in my copy of “The Ballad of Little River” by Paul Hemphill. We were at a book-signing at the Georgia Governor’s Mansion, where Roy Barnes had just delivered a thundering introduction that begain, “Thank God for Alabama!” We all appreciated the double entendre: First, the story in “Little River” made Georgia look good by comparison; secondly, Alabama had given us Paul Hemphill.

The gumbo comment was Paul’s little way of reminding me that, while he had forgiven me, he still had not forgotten the night we had made gumbo in my kitchen. I don’t cook well with others. I was trying a new anti-depressant which wasn’t quite right, exacerbated by the fact that I was washing the medicine down with significant quantities of Jack Daniels.

And I was a pluperfect bitch. Probably one of my best (worst?) performances ever, at something I’m damn good at. The clever insults and putdowns rolled off my lips like little barbed honey drops. I contradicted him on everything about making gumbo, from the quality of the seasoning on a cast iron pot, to how brown the rue was supposed to get, to how much filé to add and when. At the time, I was confident of my brilliance. I didn’t know jack about making gumbo, but that didn’t slow me down.

Obama and Ghana

by | Jul 11, 2009
Obama and Ghana

Of all the countries in Africa, including Kenya, the home of his father and ancestors, President Barack Obama chose Ghana as his one stopping point on the continent and I’m glad he did. I traveled to Ghana on a grant from the NEA and Southern Arts Federation to document former President Jimmy Carter’s efforts to eradicate the scourge of Guinea Worm Disease. Given options of several African countries, I did research and asked everyone I knew with experience traveling to Africa for their opinions. I received a lot of advice, but the statement that came up over and over was that Ghanaians were the friendliest people in all of Africa. I have to concur. In several of the small, remote villages I visited, I was one of the few white people they had ever seen. Walking down dusty streets, people would cross over to greet me, shake my hand and […]

Paul Hemphill: Our great loss

by | Jul 11, 2009
Paul Hemphill: Our great loss

My favorite description of Paul Hemphill appeared in an article Doug Monroe wrote for Creative Loafing. That article now hangs in a frame on a wall at Manuel’s Tavern. Paul “came into his own as a writer at the time Atlanta came into its own as a city,” Doug wrote in the 2005 story. “He became a street-prowling chronicler of life in a Southern town that was blooming into a major-league city.” And what “a street-prowling chronicler of life” in the city Paul was. In later years, many readers knew him best as the author of well-regarded books. But his work as a newspaper columnist in the 1960s was nothing short of awe-inspiring. Reading Paul was simply a privilege. Getting to know him was a privilege, too. I remember once talking with him about how messy life can become and how much emotional baggage people can carry as we grow […]

Grand romance and caustic cynicism in ‘Cheri’

by | Jul 9, 2009
Grand romance and caustic cynicism in 'Cheri'

Take the timeless, transcendent beauty of Michelle Pfeiffer, add a biting, bawdy Kathy Bates, place them in the sublime setting of Paris’s Belle Epoque, and slowly and sensuously stir it all together with the direction of Stephen Frears (“Dangerous Liasons”) in a batter composed of two short stories by Colette. The result: a saucy sweet and tartly tasty French soufflé called “Cheri,” now playing at the Tara Theater in Atlanta. Cheri is a delicious but imperfect dish. It has a bit of a slow start, a tad of miscasting and a somewhat expected plot. But I loved every delectable bite. Pfeiffer is phenomenal in this luscious mixture of grand romance and caustic cynicism….wit and wistfulness. It is set in tres chic Paris during its most beautiful era, and the clothes are awesome. Need I say more? Pfeiffer at 51 is still perhaps the most beautiful actress on film. With a […]

Remember The Titan

by | Jul 9, 2009
Remember The Titan

I was at a pool on July 4th at the corner of Independence and Liberty, enjoying a wonderful mixture of lemonade and vodka, and messing with my phone when one of my friends (TPaulin08) launched this missive into the Twittersphere: RIP McNair. Dumbly, I stared at it for a solid 15, 20 seconds, vodka addled mind doing it’s best impersonation of racing. Do we know a McNair? Is it like a 1970s NFL player who I would only know from behind NFL Films music (Sam Spence is amazing)? I stumbled on my phone to ESPN.com, and was met with the headline that Steve McNair was dead. And my first thought wasn’t of his illustrious career, or the four sons he left behind, but my first thought was of Chris Benoit. Dead professional wrestler, Chris Benoit. The Monday night after they found the bodies of Chris, his wife Nancy, and their […]

God of Greed? Or Charity & Justice?

by | Jul 8, 2009
God of Greed? Or Charity & Justice?

“God Bless America.” We’ve made it our national hymn and we force our elected officials to recite the words from every podium, on every occasion, every time, else have their patriotism challenged. Patriotism? Where along the way did our nation of immigrants – our masses of indebted, desperate and persecuted ancestors – acquire the belief that the USA’s great wealth is a blessing from God? Which if true would mean, ipso facto, that those who suffer must be fallen from grace? Hmm. Our Country ’Tis of Thee, and as for unbelievers, Let the Heathen Rage. Pope Benedict’s encyclical this week on economic justice skewers this careless attitude toward faith and the economy. It is an explicit intellectual challenge to the moral fragility of a worldwide economy answerable solely to shareholders. And it is a hopeful note for progressives in the Roman Catholic Church – and for the faithful of any […]

Time, as it was

by | Jul 7, 2009
Time, as it was

It is a summer night in South Alabama, shortly before the 20th Century’s first great collision with hell. Austria-Hungary will declare war on Serbia in five days; within two weeks, the slaughter will be under way on both the Eastern and Western Fronts. The pace of events throughout the world is accelerating like a teamless wagon clattering down a hillside, but as Sarah Clementine Murdock picks up a pencil to write her daughter, time still moves at its immemorial pace.

Clio, July 23, 1914

My darling Belle,

I have been trying to get the chance to write to you all this week; but it just looks like I never will do any thing. I just want to talk to you so much more than to write. I am trying to make Dad some shirts, and it worries me so to sew. I reckon I am getting too old; but I am always tired when I start. I was sorry that Minie wrote you about Nat, for you all have enough there. He is some better I think, all-though he is suffering with his back. They are treating it and going to try to keep from operating if they can help it. I hope so. Anyway, Lucy came back Monday, and brought her aunt and little sister with her; but I enjoyed it. She is a nice good girl, and I enjoyed her company, and she did not mind helping me. You would like her.

Being There

by | Jul 7, 2009
Being There

As I was hiking into a remote farming village deep in the Bangladesh countryside, a gentle rain started falling. I rounded a curve in the trail and looked into the face of a young girl bathing in the village pond. I don’t consider myself a cutting edge photographer and sometimes the element of my images that makes them work is the effort I took in being there. I have done several assignments for CARE, a humanitarian organization fighting global poverty in sixty-six countries. With their national headquarters in downtown Atlanta, they are ambassadors of the south around the world. Traveling to Nicaragua, my wife and I took a day to explore the Hugo Chavez Barrio outside Managua. I have always found the most generous, gracious people in the poorest areas of a country and this was no exception. We looked into the yard of one of the hundreds of corrugated […]

A DayGlo Roadside Reminder

by | Jul 5, 2009
A DayGlo Roadside Reminder

When I first passed this old bus sticking out of the woods on the side of a winding road in the North Carolina mountains, I was a little lost and a little stressed about finding my way to my destination before nightfall. Yet it caught my eye and my imagination. Several times over the next couple of days I thought of it – the white, the rust, the DayGlo paint is slowiy giving way to the green advance of nature. With only a flash impression, I created a whole fantasy about the bus. Maybe because I recently saw “Hair” on Broadway, I dreamt that hippies had lived in it. They bought it used and cheap and joined a peace caravan. People smoked pot in it, made love, wore tie dye t-shirts and those cool blouses with the little round mirrors. So I went back. Out of my way, but I […]

Listening to the Refrigerator Magnet

by | Jul 5, 2009
Listening to the Refrigerator Magnet

Sarah Palin should have actually listened to her parents’ refrigerator magnet rather than quoting it: The wisdom of the magnet was: “don’t explain: your friends don’t need it and your enemies won’t believe you anyway.” Instead she explained – dribbling and mixing basketball metaphors with dead fish, lame ducks, milk and war. (The “we are not retreating” quote that she wrongly attributed to General MacArthur, was actually said by General Oliver Smith during the Korean War.) The astute magnet was right when it proclaimed: “your enemies won’t believe you anyway.” I confess. Upon hearing and reading Palin’s explanation (AKA, justification), I practically ran to our kitchen box in search of the meaning of life. I actually did find most of the meaning of my life in a photo gallery of family and friends, sprinkled with a few narcissistic, magnetic insights: “Take Me to Paris,”Warning, Unapologetic Liberal,“Bon Voyage,” “Hurrah! At Last […]

Have party … will travel

by | Jul 4, 2009
Have party ... will travel

Parties are springing up all over the United States this weekend. But last week some contributors to Like the Dew got a jump on the celebrations with a gathering at the home of Arthur and Eleanor Ringel Cater in Atlanta. Here are snapshots of some of the people who were there, in hopes that readers can enjoy a virtual Dew gathering of their own. Photos, from top: The hosts, Eleanor Ringel Cater and Arthur Cater, wonder who’s going to clean up the mess after this get-together ends. Clockwise from left, Ron Feinberg, Eleanor Ringel Cater, Jennifer Hill, Tom Walker, Melinda Ennis and Arthur Cater (eating a nacho) discuss great stories they would like to read or write. Arthur interrupts a couple of times to say he really likes the nachos. Conversations about potential stories break out in various corners At left, Lee Leslie talks with an invisible person (who, he […]

Born on the 4th of July

by | Jul 4, 2009
Born on the 4th of July

His name is legion in the United States of America’s great family album – the veteran who serves youthful years in horrific danger in a distant war, then comes home and never has much to say about it. Unless calling up memories that make us laugh with him. Walter Boone Lucas was such a fellow. With smiling self-deprecation, he would tell of being drafted in Baltimore in 1942, marching on the boardwalk in Atlantic City (hasty mustering of fresh troops) with a broom handle (rifle shortage), in boots too big (no size 6.5 available), then training as a radio technician at Kelly Field in San Antonio but not being immediately assigned like everyone else (his name literally lost by the paper pushers). After all fellow trainees had shipped out, he inquired about his own status, and only then got an assignment. To cap it off, he sailed on a commandeered […]

Kennesaw Mountain: Now a snapshot of diversity

by | Jul 4, 2009
Kennesaw Mountain: Now a snapshot of diversity

This week marks the 145th anniversary of the brutal Civil War battle fought at Kennesaw Mountain. What better time to take note of how one venue of that ferociously fought war to protect segregation and slavery has become the picture of diversity? My husband and I have been hiking the Kennesaw trails for almost 20 years and have been increasingly struck by the growing array of accents, languages, skin colors and ages visiting this historic national park. Independence Day weekend presents an opportune time to check this out for yourself. Last weekend, we took the Cheatham Hill trail to Kolb Farm (bordered by Powder Springs Road), and our trek back toward the mountain included a stop at the Illinois Monument – an imposing honor to the Illinois boys and men who died in the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain. We were stunned that we hadn’t even known of its existence and […]

The finish line

by | Jul 4, 2009
The finish line

The view from the finish line in Atlanta’s Piedmont Park of the 2009 AJC Peachtree Road Race, Saturday, July 4th. The weather was perfect. The park beautiful. And the crowd festive. Click here to read more at AJC.com – it is their race and their story.

“Fire” works for the 4th? This Just Doesn’t Dew

by | Jul 4, 2009
“Fire” works for the 4th? This Just Doesn’t Dew

This was not the barbecue we had in mind for Dewers this fourth of July. A small fire at the LikeTheDew web-hosting provider’s data center on fireworks-eve knocked us offline leaving our readers without their independent morning Dewsletter on Independence Day. It also left many Independence Day stories homeless and now a bit dated. Ironically, the fire demonstrated our dependence, after all. Yes, we are dependent upon consistent technology to support home delivery of The Dew. It is a reminder of the need for back-up systems (we dew – multiple and off-site), alternative providers (we don’t afford), and a preparedness plan (we will) for such unexpected events. Readiness is especially important to small arts organizations, whose ability to provide continuity in the face of emergencies is extremely important. As one “Dewer” wrote, “It’s terrible to be voiceless and powerless, isn’t it? I miss our site.” Another consoled, “…happy to hear […]

Trimming the Liriope

by | Jul 2, 2009
Trimming the Liriope

Southern families are bound by traditions and rituals. We all tend to do things when and how we have done them before. And the same is true with my own kin. Thus Thanksgiving dinner is commonly served at 2:00 p.m. on Thanksgiving Day, and the main course is turkey. The Christmas tree goes up on the first Saturday in December, and it comes down during the first week of the New Year. The Halloween candy must be a combination of Milk Duds and Milky Ways—which is sort of my tradition, in case there are some left the next morning—and the bill of fare on the Fourth of July will invariably be barbecued ribs. And every year, sometime early in March but no later than the 15th, we trim the liriope.

I am using the imperial “we” here, of course.

If you are unfamiliar with liriope, then you must not be from around these parts.

Save the life of a soldier

by | Jul 2, 2009
Save the life of a soldier

Did you know that more soldiers die from accidents than from active military engagement? A few years back, I had the opportunity to collaborate with Mark Schulz, Word Entertainment recording artist, to create “Letters from War”, a poignant music video that brought home the painful effects of war on family and loved ones. Today, as more and more American Soldiers return home, they struggle adapting to a life and routine that’s far removed from what they faced at war. PTSD, depression, drug abuse, and accident-related deaths are on the rise among Soldiers who have returned from combat. This Independence Day, let’s make more people aware of how they can support these brave men and women as they transition to their new lives. Let’s reach out to families and friends who have spent many months waiting for their loved ones to return home. How can you help? Be a part of […]

A Berry Liberal Cake Made with Free Radicals for July 4th

by | Jul 2, 2009
A Berry Liberal Cake Made with Free Radicals for July 4th

Wasn’t it the late-great, George Carlin who asked one of the most profound questions of our age when he pondered aloud, “Why is there no blue food?” It’s important for a theme queen like me to have some red-white-and-BLUE food for July 4th. Bleu-cheeseburgers? Not if there are kids at the cookout. Who can blame them? Appreciation for the flavors of old mold will come with age, so to speak. (See instead a great recipe for Vidalia Onion Sliders below.) The best of blue food It seems that only dessert can trumpet the proud tradition of our grand ‘ole flag when it comes to fare. This is no compromise indeed. Flag food can be created with some of our All-American favorites: blueberries, strawberries, or raspberries with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream. This is a concession we can all make in the national interest. And, for that matter, in our […]

The Word from Athens

by | Jul 2, 2009
The Word from Athens

The marquee of the famed Georgia Theatre in Athens usually features the names of well-known bands or bands you never heard of but probably will hear of in the future. The theatre has hosted such famed bands as REM, Widespread Panic, U2 and others who got their start in Georgia’s music city. A few weeks ago, the interior of the Georgia Theatre was gutted by fire, although the exterior is still intact. Now, the marquee simply says “Ouch!”

Downtown … no finer place, for sure

by | Jul 2, 2009
Downtown ... no finer place, for sure

If you’ve had a notion in recent years that Atlanta is getting crowded “inside the Perimeter,” you’re right. Some new research shows that the core cities in America’s largest metropolitan areas have been growing faster than the suburbs outside those cities, which the experts regard as a significant change. And — no surprise — the City of Atlanta has posted one of the strongest records of population growth since 2001 among the 75 large urban areas surveyed. Also no surprise, the worst economy since the Great Depression is partly responsible, although this trend apparently started before the recession and is expected to continue even when the economy recovers. The research by Brookings Institution demographer Richard H. Frey was reported in The Wall Street Journal, and can be accessed here. As with most population changes, this one “is the result of a whole slew of factors,” says the WSJ, citing […]