MLK-9

Following Mrs. King’s death in 2006, a treasure trove of Dr. King's notes and sermons which had been stacked alongside boxes of Christmas ornaments in her home was offered up for auction to the highest bidder by the King children. Sotheby's Auctions estimated the documents could bring from $15 to $20 million from global bidders. A previous cache of King papers had been lost to Stanford University. Stanford’s Claiborne Carlson, out on the “curvaceous slopes of California” outbid Emory University which sought to keep these relics of American history in Atlanta. The bleeding of this remaining archive from Dr. King's hometown was too much for Atlanta's already injured civic pride. Cajoled by former congressman and King aide Andy Young, the city's business community dug deep and came up with collateral for a $32 million bank loan to buy the archive of their father from the King heirs which would then displayed at the Atlanta History Center, then handed over to Dr. King's alma mater, Morehouse College. The King legacy as commodity has been a circle completed. Atlanta kept the works of its native son but it took top dollar-- $12 million more than Sotheby's highest estimate-- to do the deed. The family was once more enriched. The King legacy was further impoverished.

Following Mrs. King’s death in 2006, a treasure trove of Dr. King’s notes and sermons which had been stacked alongside boxes of Christmas ornaments in her home was offered up for auction to the highest bidder by the King children. Sotheby’s Auctions estimated the documents could bring from $15 to $20 million from global bidders.
A previous cache of King papers had been lost to Stanford University. Stanford’s Claiborne Carlson, out on the “curvaceous slopes of California” outbid Emory University which sought to keep these relics of American history in Atlanta. The bleeding of this remaining archive from Dr. King’s hometown was too much for Atlanta’s already injured civic pride. Cajoled by former congressman and King aide Andy Young, the city’s business community dug deep and came up with collateral for a $32 million bank loan to buy the archive of their father from the King heirs which would then displayed at the Atlanta History Center, then handed over to Dr. King’s alma mater, Morehouse College. The King legacy as commodity has been a circle completed. Atlanta kept the works of its native son but it took top dollar– $12 million more than Sotheby’s highest estimate– to do the deed. The family was once more enriched. The King legacy was further impoverished.

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