The ongoing legacy of Martin and Coretta King, shown here in their conjoined crypt at Atlanta’s King Center, was supposed to carry the struggles of 1955, 1963, 1964 and 1968 into the 21st century using new strategies to address new facets of the age-old evils of injustice, war and inequality. But the King Center for Nonviolent Social Change has been largely mute in these increasingly desperate times. Cash-strapped management can’t even afford to patch the cracks in the moat surrounding the tomb. King’s dynamic legacy is inert just when the nation needs it most.

The ongoing legacy of Martin and Coretta King, shown here in their conjoined crypt at Atlanta’s King Center, was supposed to carry the struggles of 1955, 1963, 1964 and 1968 into the 21st century using new strategies to address new facets of the age-old evils of injustice, war and inequality. But the King Center for Nonviolent Social Change has been largely mute in these increasingly desperate times. Cash-strapped management can’t even afford to patch the cracks in the moat surrounding the tomb. King’s dynamic legacy is inert just when the nation needs it most.

The ongoing legacy of Martin and Coretta King, shown here in their conjoined crypt at Atlanta’s King Center, was supposed to carry the struggles of 1955, 1963, 1964 and 1968 into the 21st century using new strategies to address new facets of the age-old evils of injustice, war and inequality. But the King Center for Nonviolent Social Change has been largely mute in these increasingly desperate times. Cash-strapped management can’t even afford to patch the cracks in the moat surrounding the tomb. King’s dynamic legacy is inert just when the nation needs it most.

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