called personal responsibilty

Wayne LaPierre holding gun laws hostage by DonkeyHotey

OK, we’ve all been waiting breathlessly for Congress to change the gun-control laws in order to make America safer. My lungs are about to collapse, aren’t yours? I was sure they’d take some action after Orlando, but the votes are in, and guess what? NADA.

So, how about looking at the problem from a whole different perspective? One that takes away the need for laws and court hearings and the involvement of governmental agencies.

For instance: is there a law that requires gun-shop owners to sell semi-automatic rifles? No, I didn’t think so. What if they would refuse to sell, or even stock, such weapons? After all, they are designed to be used in combat by trained military personnel. It’s hard for me to believe that those owners are so greedy that they prefer profit over the lives of so many innocent victims. I’d love to ask them, “What if one or more of the dead happened to belong to you? What if the mangled body of your little girl lay amidst the carnage?” I wonder what their answer would be.

Or better yet, why don’t the manufacturers of the AK-47 and other assault weapons limit their sales to the military? Now there’s a thought! They have CEO’s, don’t they? And boards of directors? Shareholders? I’m guessing those are living, breathing, feeling human beings with homes and families just like you and me and the gun-shop owners. I’d like to ask them the same questions, plus “How do you feel, being complicit in the horrendous acts of violence taking place across our country? Really, is the money that good? That important?”

When I first started to write this article I aimed my remarks at state and local governments, urging them to take the action that Congress has failed to take. (Thankfully, seven states and D. C. already have.) I invoked the overwhelming majority of citizens who want such restrictions, “to forget about Washington and focus on the governing bodies closer to home. Get organized. Get together and make signs. Make noise! Parade at gun shows and gun-shops, at city council and county commission meetings. Go to your state capital and raise a ruckus. Make it clear that ‘we the people’ want something done to stop the mass killings of innocent folks.”

But as I thought more about it the idea of stopping the supply of those weapons at the source seemed so much better, so much simpler, and so much easier. No laws necessary. No mass supplications. No complicated record keeping. Just a firm “NO” by the supplier to anyone requesting such weaponry.

Of course that’s not a perfect answer to our problem. I know that. There will still be instances of murder and mayhem in this country. And yes, much work would remain to be done in the areas of mental health and education.

But the acceptance of personal responsibility by the manufacturers to make their product unavailable to the general public would go a long way toward making mass killings fewer and farther between.

Think about it.

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Image: Wayne LaPierre holding gun laws hostage by DonkeyHotey via flickr and used a Creative Commons license.

Gail Kiracofe

Born in Mishawaka, Indiana, Gail has moved around the country a lot and now lives in a retirement community in Virginia. She was a Marine Corps wife and worked for the Girl Scouts in Georgia, Oklahoma, and Tennessee. She takes lots of Life Long Learning classes, and continues to hone her writing skills.