John. Paul. George. Ringo. And Vince. Vince?

Beatlefan MagazineIt’s quite logical to Bill King, founder and publisher of Beatlefan magazine. Now in its 31st year, Beatlefan is a source for, well, Beatlefans worldwide. The Vince noted above is Vince Dooley, who began coaching the Georgia Bulldogs in 1964, the same year The Beatles came to America. As with millions of young people, Bill King’s life was strongly influenced watching The Beatles on The Ed Sullivan Show those three winter nights in ’64. He not only became a fan but would make The Beatles part of his life’s work. Vince Dooley’s achievements as the Bulldogs’ coach would lead to a similar path for King. The Fab Five and Bill King have made quite a team.

Bill King at the Atlanta Journal Constitution
Bill King, founder and publisher of Beatlefan magazine at the AJC

King established himself by the mid ’70’s as a savvy reporter on the rock scene for The Atlanta Constitution. His columns in the paper’s Saturday entertainment section were widely read by fans and record business insiders. Bill King had lots to write about, especially when it came to The Beatles. But a daily metro newspaper only has so much space; not near enough for all the material King had gathered. The situation provided Bill with an idea that created a new outlet and assured him of  keeping his day job. He and his family would work together in the evenings  on a special project: A magazine for fans of The Beatles. So in December ’78, Beatlefan was introduced. The first issue featured a scoop on Paul McCartney leaving Capitol Records to sign with Columbia. It also included an interview with former Wings drummer Joe English.

Beatlefan MagazineQuickly, Bill and his wife, Leslie King, Beatlefan’s general manager, achieved the goal they set for the magazine. King had long noted that many Beatles fanzines were amatuerish. He and Leslie felt fans of The Beatles deserved a professionally published news magazine. Beatlefan filled that void, and it continues to do so. The latest edition, number 180, features in-depth commentary on the remastered Beatles CDs. The reporting is thorough and engaging. Even those who have listened closely to every Beatles song since 1964 will learn much from the coverage offered by the Beatlefan reviewers.

As Bill King was listening closely to his Beatles records in ’64, he also watched his Georgia Bulldogs with great excitement. Though only a kid, Bill had already witnessed many great UGA moments. New Coach Vince Dooley was expected to provide even more. And he did. Over his 25 years as coach, Dooley would make the Georgia Bulldogs a college football power. There was the national championship in 1980 and the recruiting of many great players, including Herschel Walker. Dooley also accomplished much as the school’s Athletic Director, a position he retained 15 years after his retirement from coaching.

Junkyard BlawgUGA fans are some of the most loyal and intense in American sports. The success during the  Dooley years and since have provided them with much to cheer about. The fans eat, sleep, talk and breathe Georgia football. There’s always a demand for new Bulldogs information. And who provides that? None other than Bill King. Since 2005 he has been the Bulldogs’ watchdog on’s Junkyard Blawg. Throughout the year, King weighs in several times weekly on  UGA sports, especially on developments regarding the football team. This year fans are anxious for news as the 2009 season was unusual for the Bulldogs. The team’s record was mediocre, and changes have been made on the coaching staff. Given such fan devotion, there is also much frustration. It comes across big-time on Junkyard Blawg.

Fans of The Beatles are a passionate group as well, and very much larger than that of UGA’s football team. But thet’s not a problem for Bill King. He knows his beats very well. For decades he has reported on all the action, from Liverpool, England to Athens, Georgia. It’s quite logical to him. After all, one of his favorite Beatles songs is “Hey Bulldog.”

Jeff Cochran

Jeff Cochran

Jeff Cochran worked in advertising at The Atlanta Journal-Constitution for 27 years before accepting a buy-out in the Summer of 2008. In the seventies/early eighties, he handled advertising for Peaches Records and Tapes' Southeastern and Midwestern stores. He also wrote record reviews for The Great Speckled Bird, a ground-breaking underground newspaper based in Atlanta.